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Bogle Agency
300 College Ave.

Fort Worth, TX 76104

Tel. 806-445-1205

Lauren@TheBogleAgency.com

Copyright © 2019 Bogle Agency. All rights reserved.

You don't know corn.


The first of its kind. A behind-the-scenes look into the compelling harvesting industry in small town USA. There’s a love-hate relationship between farmers, harvesters, and dairy farmers. Most days, more hate than love, but business is business. Right? Forage harvesting. A culture comprised of crops, cowboys, and cussin' politics.

Dexter, New Mexico. Where many old-school farming techniques still exist. With new technology and massive harvesting equipment from John Deere and Claas, this small farming town’s traditional way of life is being threatened by 21st century modernization. Small towns bring big drama, especially when most of the employees were born and raised in the Pecos Valley. Silage harvesters. Foragers. Choppers. Call ‘em what you want. They’re the ones who work tireless hours to feed your livestock. 

What the forage?


Fighting supply and demand, reliable workers, and customer negotiation can get intense in the agricultural world, but everyone has a reputation to uphold.

Now, let’s talk about silage. Silage can be grass, corn, sorghum, wheat… you get the gist. The crops are chopped into small pieces, and compacted together in a large silo. As in 240 tonnes large. Next, we ferment. The stored silage is fermented from 10 days to 3 weeks before given to livestock. Although this process is similar to haylage; it differs in freshness. Silage is fresh. Haylage is dried. Now, we’re not saying silage is better, but silage is better!

Since its establishment in 2017, Bogle Agency has worked closely with Bogle Ltd and B&B Choppers. Lauren Bogle, Owner and Founder of Bogle Agency was a former employee of B&B Choppers and is now acting part-owner of the family business. Bogle’s passion and goal to bring a spotlight to the agricultural industry came to be after studying agricultural communications at Texas Tech University. Working side-by-side with its employees and her knowledge of the business and culture has built a rapport with the employees and fellow forage harvesters in the region.